May 1, 2019

Four Ohio State Teams Recognized for Outstanding Academic Performance

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NCAA Release

Columbus, Ohio – Four Ohio State teams – football, women’s golf, women’s soccer and men’s tennis – have been honored with public recognition awards for academic performance, the NCAA announced Wednesday. The awards are given each year to teams scoring in the Top 10 percent in each sport based on their most recent multi-year Academic Progress Rates (APR).

“The most recent release of the NCAA’s Public Recognition Awards finds a repeat recipient of the prestigious honor. Men’s tennis is joined by three new teams among those with the highest APR scores in the country: football, women’s golf and women’s soccer,” Dr. John Davidson, Ohio State Faculty Athletics Representative, said. “The Academic Progress Rate tracks student-athlete retention and success in the classroom. Our leadership, starting with coaches and moving throughout the athletics structure, has very high academic standards and actively strives for a culture of success.”

The four Buckeye teams recognized this year are outstanding both in academics and athletics.

“These teams exemplify the mutually reinforcing aspects of being a top-flight athlete and student at Ohio State,” Davidson said. “Women’s soccer made its ninth NCAA appearance in 10 years, while seeing 26 team members honored as Ohio State Scholar-Athletes. Women’s golf appears on the list fresh off of the 11th Big Ten Championship in program history.  Football adds this honor to its recent Big Ten and Rose Bowl Championships, which left the program at No. 3 in the national rankings. While generating award-winning academic records, men’s tennis has produced an unprecedented string of Big Ten regular-season and tournament championships and, earlier this year, an ITA National Indoor Championship.  This strong academic showing is indicative of Buckeye student-athletes’ drive and ability and the value placed on success and well-being in all aspects of their endeavors.”

This is the sixth time the Ohio State men’s tennis team, under head coach Ty Tucker, has been recognized by the NCAA. The squad was also honored each year from 2008-11 and in 2018. The Buckeyes recently wrapped up a 14th-consecutive Big Ten regular season championship and the program’s 12th B1G Tournament title since 2006. Monday Ohio State was named the No. 1 overall seed in the NCAA Tournament and the squad will host NCAA first and second round matches this weekend in Columbus.

The football program is being recognized for an APR public recognition award for the fourth time. The team is coming off consecutive Big Ten Conference championships in 2017 and 2018. The team’s 13-1 record in 2018 represented the second-highest win total in school history and the season was capped by a win over Washington, 28-23, in the Rose Bowl Game.
This is the first time the Ohio State women’s soccer team, under the direction of head coach Lori Walker-Hock, has been recognized by the NCAA. The 2018 Buckeyes went 9-6-4, including 6-2-3 in Big Ten play, on their way to the program’s ninth NCAA Tournament appearance in the last 10 seasons.

The Ohio State women’s golf team, led by head coach and director of golf Therese Hession, earns its second recognition by the NCAA after also being honored in 2011-12. The Buckeyes won their 18th Big Ten championship in April while senior Niki Schroeder became Ohio State’s 15th medalist at Big Ten Championships. The 2019 season marks the 25th-consecutive season the Buckeyes have advanced to NCAA play as they’ll head to Cle Elum, Wash., to participate in an NCAA Regional May 6-8.

In the 15th year of APR data for most teams, the scores provide a real-time look at a team’s academic success each semester by tracking the academic progress of each student-athlete on scholarship. The APR accounts for academic eligibility, retention and graduation and provides a measure of each team’s academic performance. The most recent APR scores are based on a multi-year rate that averages scores from the 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 academic years.