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Click here for more information. The Brandr Group will manage and administer the program, as it currently does on behalf of active professional athletes in developing business through group player rights in college.

Click here to learn the Dos and Don’ts of your NIL activities.

Click here to visit The Darlow Rules courses (login with your Ohio State email)

You may not use photos or videos containing Ohio State trademarks, logos, service marks, symbols, or other intellectual property in your NIL Activities.

Click here to learn more.

NIL ACTIVITY: means activities for which student-athletes receive Compensation including but are not limited to, autograph signings, personal appearances, social media endorsements, camps/clinics, private lessons,  promoting a commercial product or service, and charity events.

OFFICIAL TEAM ACTIVITY:  means practices, competitions, exhibitions, scrimmages, team appearances, team and individual photograph sessions, sports camps sponsored by Ohio State, outside competitions where the student-athlete’s  appearance and expense are funded by Ohio State, team meetings, team travel to and from competitions, community service events, and media appearances and interviews (regardless of whether the activity takes place on or off campus).

TEAM TRAVEL: During home and away competitions, including team travel AND outside competitions funded by Ohio State, you are representing Ohio State Athletics; as such, no NIL activities may occur from the time the student-athlete reports to and enters an Ohio State facility or transportation, until the student-athlete leaves the Ohio State facility or transportation.   The only exception during team travel is if there is a designated “free time” on your team travel itinerary.

You may not endorse or wear non-Nike accessories or gear during any team travel or official team activity that is funded by Ohio State.

*Click for more Treatment of Name, Image and Likeness

  • NIL income such as stipends, appearance fees, etc.  generally reported on a 1099 are to be reported on the FAFSA as income in the appropriate filing year ( example: 2021 income to be reported on the 2023/24 FAFSA).
  • In-kind compensation that is part of an NIL contract such as vehicles, clothing, etc. is also to be reported on a 1099
  • NIL income is not treated as estimated financial assistance (EFA) if appropriately captured as income
  • It is possible that a dependent student athlete may still end up being Pell eligible based on the parent’s income in certain situations outlined in the guidance.
  • Resources that are not income that are provided to a student athlete must be accounted for as EFA such as Alston academic or graduation incentive awards.  ED further clarified that complimentary room and board given to athletes must also be captured as EFA.
  • Under the requirement to resolve conflicting information regulations (administrative capability 34 CFR 668.16(f)) the Department further clarified that if an institution is aware of an NIL contract for a student athlete, we must ensure it is accounted for appropriately even if the student is not selected for federal verification.   For example, if Athletic Compliance is aware of an NIL agreement,  SFA is also considered to be aware and is responsible for ensuring accurate information is used for Title IV eligibility determination.

Distilled spirits (i.e., hard liquor)

Tobacco products (including electronic smoking devices, vapor products or products or devices that consists of or contains nicotine that can be ingested into the body);

Casinos or any entity that sponsors or promotes gambling activities;

Controlled substances;
Marijuana (including legalized or medical) products;

Medical marijuana cultivator, processor, lab or retail dispensary; or

Any business engaged in the sale, rental, or exhibition for any form of consideration of adult entertainment that is characterized by an emphasis on the exposure or display of sexual activity.

A student-athlete must disclose all compensated NIL Activities prior to the activity occurring to Ohio State through Opendorse. You are required to disclose the details surrounding the activity (i.e., what the activity includes, when and where the activity will occur, individuals and businesses connected to the activity, compensation, your verbal or written NIL agreement, etc.). Failure to disclose an NIL Activity in advance could lead to eligibility consequences.

Activity Disclosure Form (fill out prior to the activity occurring!)

Want to have an event on campus? Fill out this form (fill out prior to the activity occurring!)

Learn the rental fees for each location by clicking here.

Click here to place a request to rent a facility.

May I receive payment to appear in a commercial or endorse a commercial product?
No, not if the service is performed in the United States.

May I receive compensation for a personal appearance at an event?
No, not if the appearance is in the United States.

May I receive compensation for providing lessons or coaching at a private camp, club, or clinic in the United States?
No. (Please discuss employment at OSU on-campus camps with OIA.)

May I receive compensation for signing an autograph?
No, not if you are signing in the United States.

May I establish my own business selling products and services?
No, not in the United States. Note: an F-1 student can invest in the United States (e.g., buy stock in a company), but cannot receive income or remuneration as a result of providing services to any company, including one owned by the F-1 student.

May I sell institutional awards (rings, apparel, etc.) once I have finished my athletics eligibility?
Yes. An F-1 student may sell personal possessions, provided this is not undertaken as a regular business or trade. (Any questions should be addressed to an immigration attorney.)

May I use my name, image, or likeness in connection with a personal crowdfunding page to raise money for my personal education expenses or family hardships?
If the page is set up while the student-athlete is outside the U.S. and no further activity is undertaken related to promotion of the page while in the U.S., then this activity may be permissible. (Please consult with an immigration attorney.) However, the U.S. government may consider active operation\updating\promotion of such a page while in the U.S. to be no different than operating a business for income.

May I use my name, image, or likeness in connection with a personal crowdfunding page to raise money for charity?
Yes, provided you receive no compensation, remuneration, or benefit from the charity in any way. (Please consult with an immigration attorney.)

For more information, contact The Ohio State Office of International Affairs (OIA): https://oia.osu.edu

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