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Oct. 19, 1999

COLUMBUS, Oh. – The Ohio State women’s varsity crew continues the fall schedule Oct. 23-24 with the Head of the Charles in Boston, Mass.

Head of the Charles
The Buckeyes will compete in the championship eight event, with only the first varisty eight boat taking the trip. The event is the last on Sunday and will begin at 4:05 p.m. The regatta is the world’s largest two-day rowing event. More than 5,500 athletes worldwide competed in the 19 events in 1998. In the women’s championship eight field, there are close to 60 collegian crews. They include the same competitors the Buckeyes raced at the Head of the Ohio. Ohio State fans can learn more on the regatta at www.hocr.org.

Coach’s Thoughts
“Finishing in the top five at the Head of the Charles would be phenomenonal,” Andy Teitelbaum, OSU head coach, said. “Lasy year we finished 12th, seventh among colleges. A placing equal to that would be wonderful. Its early and there are going to be a lot of great, talented crews in the event.”

Head of the Ohio Recap
The varisty crew finished with 21 points at their season-opening regatta in Pittsburgh, Pa., on the Allegheny River. The “A” crew placed fifth in the open eight event. All three crews claimed a Top 20 spot in the open four race. Connie Kirsch (So., Potsdam, Germany) had a second-place finish with a time of 18:31.6 in the open singles event. Freshmen Maxi Meissner (Schoenow, Germany) placed sixth and Phae Giblin (NSW Australia) finished 13th in the event. Katie Buttine (Jr., Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) had a 15th-place finish in the singles race.

Fall Racing: One of a kind
The difference between fall racing and spring racing is distance. Fall racing, referred to as head racing, is a 2.5- to 3.5-mile course. The spring course is a 2,000-meter sprint. Head racing involves twists and turns along the river, whereas spring races are the first to the finish line wins. Boats in head races are launched at 10-second intervals to eliminate crashes on the water. The Head of the Charles’s course along the Charles River is close to three miles long. Noticing the Novice
Buckeye coaches and returning rowers were busy recruiting novice rowers the first week of the quarter. They stationed themselves across campus in an effort to advertise rowing to Ohio State’s female population.The Buckeyes gained 120 novice rowers from on-campus recruiting, but have cut the number to 50.

Keeping It In The Family
Freshman Molly Stauffer might not have given rowing a try if it hadn’t been for her big sister. Sophomore Mindy Stauffer rows in the first varsity eight, but started as a novice. The two sisters are from Ashland, Ohio.